enfrdeitptrues

FPS

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Sniper Ghost Warrior 3
    Developed by: CI Games
    Published by: CI Games
    Released: 25 April 2017
    Available on: PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Microsoft Windows
    Genre: First Person Shooter, Tactical Shooter
    ESRB: M for Mature (Sexual Themes, Strong Language, Drug Reference, Blood and Gore, and Intense Violence)
    Number of players: 1 (Multiplayer will be coming with a future update)
    Price:$53.00
    (Amazon Affiliate Link)

    Thank you CI Games for sending us a review copy for this game.

    Note: This review is based on the PS4 Pro version and might not look, sound, and perform the same on other consoles and PC.

    Sniper Ghost Warrior is one of two current Sniper series out right now, the other being the Sniper Elite series developed and published by Rebellion. The Sniper style of games is a very niche market of video games. Some gamers love the slower and strategic style, while others love the Fast-paced twitch style of shooters like Call of Duty, Halo, and SOCOM. Myself, I love the slower paced shooter games, known as tactical shooters.

    Sniper Ghost Warrior 3 is the third (as the name implies) in a series developed and published by City Interactive (CI Games as they call themselves now). This series has been pretty popular worldwide with the first two games selling over 5.5 million copies. CI Games has now upped the ante and brought what fans of the series have been asking for, and that is a fully open world for gamers to explore.

    In Sniper Ghost Warrior 3 (SGW3) you play Marine Captain Jonathan "Jon" North who is sent to the country of Georgia to rescue his brother, Robert North, who was kidnapped and taken by a unknown special ops unit lead by a mysterious leader 2 years before in a mission the brothers were on along the Russian Ukrainian border. Jon believes that his brother is still alive and being held somewhere in Georgia, and that is why he volunteered to go on this mission to kill the group that captured his younger brother and rescue him.

    Jon is set up in a secret small base of operations where he can rest, craft items, and plan his missions to kill the Separatist Cells (the group who captured Robert) who are destabilizing the country. Jon is helped by Lydia, a former Sniper and love interest. Along the way Jon discovers that the mission he is on is one that can affect the whole world (in a bad way) if not successfully completed.

    Sniper Ghost Warrior 3
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Excellent shooting mechanics, deep crafting and customization; large open world map to explore, and a solid engaging story.
    Weak Points: Long loading times at the start or continuation of a campaign. Occasional enemy pop in and out at long distances. Serious stability issues that cause the game to crash.
    Moral Warnings: Strong Language through out. Blood and gore used over-excessively. Some sexual themes and drug used throughout the game. Not suitable for children or young teens to play or watch.

    SGW3 has some top notch graphics and sound effects. I really enjoyed the look of the entire world. On my PlayStation Pro, the game utilized High Dynamic Resolution 10 (HDR10) brilliantly. The colors of the whole world really shown through with HDR10 and the lighting was well done. The sound effects were well done with the weapons, vehicles, and weather effects sounding very good. The chatter that civilians and enemies carried on was above average, but adequate for gaming standards today.

    One of SGW3's big strengths is its shooting mechanics. I really enjoyed lining up my shot, dialing in my scope (adjusting for distance with a dial on your scope), taking in the wind speed and direction, and then firing off my shot. The game gives you a very good sense of being a sniper and that makes us who have been wanting another great sniper game very happy. I love realism and so do the fans of the series, and that is why the Sniper Ghost Warrior franchise has a loyal fan base.

    Another strength of this game is the crafting and unlocking of more equipment. As you kill or knockout enemies you can search them and gain a variety of resources. You can also find a many different crates and boxes with resources for crafting as well. These resources can be used to create a variety of items like different types of bullets, grenades, and other gadgets. The game will also allow you to use money that you collect from fallen enemies to purchase the items mentioned above, as well as guns, gun skins, and drone upgrades as you unlock them.

    Besides resources the player can unlock weapons (for use by the player) that the enemies drop after you kill them or knock them out. This helped me find better sniper rifles and other weapons for use against the enemy (nothing like using your enemies' own weapons on them). Also there are collectables throughout the open world that once collected appear in your hideout. Also these collectables give the player a little bonus in money (so it's worth finding all of them). I loved how as I found these collectables the developer had them automatically placed in different locations throughout the rooms in your hideout. One type of favorite collectable was rifles from famous snipers in history. These sniper rifles are displayed in a special wall mounted area for the player to check out whenever they wanted. Also in regards to collectables, in the game menus you can see a picture of the item and a lengthy history about it. I love this special attention to detail that CI Games has made available for the player to enjoy.

    Lastly, another thing I liked was the map and map size. The map is rendered in great detail which is very appreciated. I loved that not all areas of interest are on the map until the player travels there and then it shows up (some games do this well, while others show everything, or almost everything). Also the map size is fairly large - not as large as "say" Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon Wildlands or Skyrim, but it's fairly large. The player as they explore more of the map will unlock "Fast Travel" sign posts which makes the traveling quicker and less of a grind.

    In regards to negatives of the game, the first thing that a gamer experiences is the long initial load time when you start or continue a campaign. It's very long and many players can be put off by it. The developers did say they would try to improve it, but that the reason for the long load time is that the game is loading the entire map and not just a portion of it. This provides for a seamless travel for the player without loading or stuttering as the player travels around the map. Also CI Games has said that this offers very quick load times when players are fast traveling around the map. I have to agree the map loads really quick compared to other games that offer fast travel (i.e. Skyrim).

    Sniper Ghost Warrior 3
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 80%
    Gameplay - 16/20
    Graphics - 8/10
    Sound - 8/10
    Stability - 3/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 72%
    Violence - 2.5/10
    Language - 5/10
    Sexual Content - 8.5/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

     

    Another negative is that the enemies pop in and out if you get too far from an area that they are in. I hope this can be fixed with a future patch; otherwise, it will get frustrating for the player when they want to pull off a 1,000 meter shot and the game won't load the enemies for the area they're supposed to be in.

    The last negative thing I want to bring up is that the stability of the game needs significant improvement. In my 20 plus hours of gameplay, the game froze once, and caused error kick outs of the game 3 times. I was very upset by this and I hope the developer will address this in a future patch.

    The game is supposed to have multiplayer but CI Games has stated they are focused first on more improvements for the game, as well single player future content, and then get the multi player content out later this year. CI Games has promised more free content through out the year so that is something to look forward too.

    For parents I would say this is not for children or young teens. This game got a "Mature" rating for a reason. It has lots of blood (when you shoot an enemy), strong language, and drug references (from time to time). If you have a teen you might want to look at Destiny, Call of Duty, and Plants vs. Zombies: Garden Warfare for their shooter fix.

    In conclusion, this is a very good sniper game with excellent shooting mechanics and realism. I would recommend any adult gamer who is looking for a deep tactical shooter and enjoys a slower style of gameplay. If you're looking for a run and gun type of military shooter you will not find it here. With future patches by the developer, this game will overcome its negative issues and truly shine.

     

  •  

    boxart
    Game Info:

    Sniper Rust VR
    Developed by: Zatun Game Studio
    Published by: Zatun Game Studio
    Release date: June 19, 2018
    Available on: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift
    Genre: Shooter
    Number of players: Single-player
    ESRB Rating: Mature for blood and intense violence
    Price: $9.99

    Thank you Zatun Game Studio for sending us a review code!

    There isn’t much of a story in Sniper Rust VR and the game starts you off in a shooting range when first launched. It’ll get you familiar with the different types of sniper rifles and the control scheme. According to the Steam page, you’re the agency’s best sharpshooter and your missions will have you going against a global insurgency.

    If you’re familiar with sniper rifles, you’ll be happy to know that this game features the DSR-50, Mac-7, and the SVD. Most of the guns only give you two shots per magazine, but the SVD goes much further. I like how each gun has a different feel and kickback. No matter which option you choose, there is no silencer and you’ll be outed after your first shot, so make it a good one!

    At your base, there will be a dog that follows you around and a computer to accept classified missions. Each mission has several parts and if you quit before completing them all, you’ll have to start over from the beginning. Most of the mission objectives are to kill everyone, but sometimes there is a hidden sniper in the mix or a high ranking official that you can’t let escape alive.

    Sniper Rust VR
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Decent variety in sniper guns to choose from; infinite ammo
    Weak Points: You cannot resume partially completed missions; dated visuals
    Moral Warnings: Blood and violence

    In the beginning of each mission, you’re free to take your time and look around to get a feel for the number of enemies and their locations. If there is a flight risk, I recommend taking them out first. Once the first shot is fired, everyone will scatter and start shooting back. Though you may have cover, it’s destructible and won’t last very long. There are in-game achievements; one of them is to clear a mission at full health, and I have yet to do that. I also haven’t earned the 100% accuracy achievements. As you earn achievements, you’ll unlock some new skins for your guns and gloves.

    Not surprisingly, there is blood that sprays when you hit someone. As you take damage your screen will get redder and redder until you’re dead. Thankfully, if you die you can restart at the current mission and not from the beginning.

    Like many first person shooter games, there’s an announcer that will compliment your shots. You’ll hear comments like “Multi-kill” and “God-like.” I don’t find those very fitting, but the notification of the last man standing is very helpful. There is background music as well, but it’s not annoying or memorable.

    Sniper Rust VR
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 68%
    Gameplay - 12/20
    Graphics - 6/10
    Sound - 7/10
    Stability - 4/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 87%
    Violence - 3.5/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

     

    The developers have listened to user feedback and are continuing to improve the game. I guess there wasn’t any or much cover when Sniper Rust VR first launched. Though the graphics have been overhauled, they’re still a bit dated. They get the job done though. The missions take place in different locales like docks, mountains, deserts, forests, and ancient temples.

    At first Sniper Rust VR was only available on Oculus and recently got HTC Vive support. With my Oculus “moderate” rated VR environment, I often struggled to see some of the enemies shooting at me. Perhaps a bigger room would make this game a little easier. I experienced some tracking issues, but many VR games have that problem. The controls are a little wonky and take a little getting used to; again a bigger VR space (or a Vive) can probably help.

    Hopefully, the gameplay gets more refined as the missions are a bit repetitive. Shoot, duck, kill everyone (or die trying), repeat. There is a demo available so that’s worth looking into if you’re interested in purchasing this game. The asking price is $9.99 which isn’t too bad. At the game’s current state, I only recommend this title for sniper enthusiasts.

  •  

    boxart
    Game Info:

    Space Junkies
    Developed by: Ubisoft Montpellier
    Published by: Ubisoft
    Release date: March 26, 2019
    Available on: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, PSVR, Windows Mixed Reality
    Genre: FPS
    Number of players: up to four players online
    ESRB Rating: Teen for violence and user interactions
    Price: $39.99
    (Humble Store Link)

    Thank you Ubisoft for sending us this game to review!

    As an aging gamer, I’ve played many classic first person shooters (FPS) when they first started to emerge in the 90s. Classic games like Wolfenstein, Doom, Quake, and Unreal Tournament bring back fond memories. The thrill of collecting better weapons, armor, and health power-ups while trying to stay alive has been added to a solid virtual reality game: Space Junkies.

    Ubisoft is no stranger to VR games and we have reviewed a few of them. Space Junkies isn’t their first multiplayer only game and I hope it succeeds as VR is still developing a user base. Thankfully, I’ve been able to find players to battle against but sometimes it takes a couple of minutes to gather one to three other players in the lobby. The first time I played there was only one other person online and I can safely say that this game is the most fun with more players. In the multiple gaming sessions I’ve embarked on, there was at least one player who would curse while playing. Keep that in mind if you’re going to have kids play this game. There are options to setup private matches or invite players/friends that you already know.

    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Fun space themed first person shooter
    Weak Points: Multiplayer only and like many VR games, this one can use more players online
    Moral Warnings: Bloodless violence; foul language used by other players online

    Before you can partake in the online battles, you must first complete the tutorial to familiarize yourself with the weapons and controls for movement. If you prefer close combat your space suit has a shield and a laser sword behind each of your shoulders. While great in a pinch, the guns are undeniably more powerful and fun to use.

    If you’re familiar with FPS games, you’ll recognize many of the guns available in Space Junkies. There are some futuristic pistols that can be dual-wielded if you can find another on the map. The chain gun is pretty powerful, but requires two hands to operate. The biorifle is super powerful as well but has to be pumped and is only good for one shot before requiring a reload. The rocket launcher is good for a few rounds and will detonate after you throw it when it’s out of ammo. The slingshot is quite powerful, but takes time to pull back and aim. If it does connect with your target, a huge chunk of their health will be gone. My biggest complaint is that health doesn’t seem to deplete fast enough when getting attacked. Although you’re given credit for headshots, it still can take a few hits before an opponent goes down from them. It all depends on the weapon used but still, a blow to the head is usually an instant kill. Just ask Goliath (1 Sam 17:49).

    The maps are well designed and have different themes to them. There are plenty of places to duck for cover, but like most FPS games, all of the good weapons and power-ups are out in the open. I like how they display a countdown for when they will respawn. If you’re playing a team-based match, you’ll have a tracker for your other teammate. For the enemies you’ll have to listen for their jetpacks to know when you’re close. If you’ve been detected, the screen will let you know and you can expect some projectiles coming your way shortly after.

    Space Junkies
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 88%
    Gameplay - 18/20
    Graphics - 8/10
    Sound - 8/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 82%
    Violence - 6/10
    Language - 5/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    Sound wise this game is pretty good. The over-enthusiastic announcer in entertaining to listen to. The weapon sound effects are fitting. There is no background music, only the sound of breathing in space.

    There are a few game modes available. Free-for-all is your standard death match mode where nobody is safe and whoever has the most kills after five minutes is declared the victor. If there are only two players you can Duel with them. King mode has a crown that can be worn by a player and non-teammates must try to take it off of their floating body. The person who wears the crown the longest, wins. Teams can consist of one to two players one each side. The more, the merrier.

    No matter if you win or lose you’ll earn experience for each battle. If you leave early, you will be penalized so please don’t do that. When your character levels up, they will get a prize box which will unlock various cosmetic items like avatars and backgrounds.

    As a multiplayer only title. Space Junkie’s success is determined by the online community. There are no bots, only some targets to shoot in the lobby while you’re waiting for people to join. So far, there has been a decent turnout of players. I hope new content keeps coming to keep players interested and that it’s a success. It’s definitely one of the better VR games out there.

  •  

    boxart
    Game Info:

    Star Wars Battlefront II
    Developed by: Electronic Arts
    Release Date: November 17, 2017
    Available on: PlayStation 4 (reviewed), Xbox One, and Microsoft Windows
    Number of Players: Single-Player (campaign), 2-Player (local), 40 Players (online)
    Genre: Third-person Shooter, First-person Shooter
    ESRB Rating: Teen for violence
    Price: $14.69
    (Amazon Affiliate Link)

    Several years ago, my siblings and I spent hours on our PlayStation 2 playing a game called Star Wars: Battlefront II. The game was a perfect culmination of two things we loved: Star Wars and video games. It was easily one of our favorite games based on a popular franchise. About ten years later, EA announced that they were rebooting the Battlefront games in a style that was more akin to modern shooter games. The result was gorgeous, but very bland. After receiving much criticism, EA took a second shot at Battlefront that featured significantly more content. While the results aren’t perfect, the final product represents a fun time and a massive improvement over its predecessor.

    The new Star Wars: Battlefront II’s upgrades are immediately clear. Instead of featuring four to five worlds based on the Original Trilogy, the game features sixteen worlds based on all three Star Wars eras. This instantly gives Battlefront II an artistic advantage. Not only is there more variety, but the worlds look much more like something out of the movies than the original. The 2015 game used the Original Trilogy’s limited special effects as an excuse to make empty worlds based on generic themes (such as a desert or a forest). This is thankfully not the case with this one. Not only are there more creative worlds from the Prequel and Sequel Trilogies, but the same worlds from the first game have much more Star Wars-specific features. For example, Tatooine actually takes place in the bustling city of Mos Eisley instead of just an empty desert.

    But the game does not only improve on the level design. Because it takes elements from all the Star Wars movies, there are significantly more characters as well. Finally, we can play as characters such as Yoda and Darth Maul in glorious HD graphics! After all the updates, pretty much all of the most important characters from the Star Wars universe are now playable, including Obi-Wan Kenobi (my favorite character since I was a kid). You are also able to play as troopers from all the eras. First Order troopers, clone troopers, Resistance soldiers, and droids join the roster, making the battles more interesting. Unlike the Heroes, though, the standard troopers are playable only on planets from their respective eras. For example, clone troopers cannot be played as on Jakku and Stormtroopers cannot be played as on Kamino.

    Star Wars Battlefront II
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: New online and offline features that make the game more whole than its predecessor; characters and worlds from the Prequel and Sequel Trilogies are featured; level up system keeps things balanced for new players; graphics continue to look amazing
    Weak Points: Physics are a little floaty; requires paid services for the majority of features (consoles only); lots of data needed to play
    Moral Warnings: Violence consistent with the Star Wars franchise; the Force is present for gameplay purposes; loot boxes

    Battlefront II also adds a number of new offline modes that makes the game feel more complete. One of the most common criticisms of the last games was a lack of a campaign mode. This time, however, there is a full canonical story dedicated to the time between Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens. The plot follows Iden Versio, the leader of the Inferno Squad, an Imperial Special Forces unit. After seeing the second Death Star blow up above the atmosphere of Endor, she now has to find out how to deal with the war afterwards. While telling the story from the perspective of an Imperial is interesting, the story itself is rather boring. It’s not only a bit short; it just doesn’t contribute anything special to the saga. I’d still say it’s better than nothing, though. Being able to play the game against CPUs with straightforward objectives is still something that has benefit, even if the context isn’t that great.

    A couple of other offline modes include Battle Scenarios and Custom Arcade. Battle Scenarios are fun because they present challenges with specific rules. Sometimes they require you to play as a certain character. Other times, they will limit what kinds of weapons you can use. Each Battle Scenario has three difficulties and is separated by Light Side and Dark Side. Custom Arcade, on the other hand, is a good way to set up your own rules. You can pick any world, what kinds of characters are available (heroes, troopers, or both), how many enemies there are, and how difficult they are. Both Battle Scenarios and Custom arcade support two-player local multiplayer, which is nice for those of us who grew up on local play.

    Of course, all of these offline modes are practically extras compared to the online modes. Battlefront II, like its 2015 predecessor, is a game that emphasizes online multiplayer. There are over ten online modes. Most are trooper based, but there are some modes for heroes and some modes for spaceships. The modes present a good amount of variety. I personally enjoy playing Heroes vs. Villains, a 4 vs. 4 multiplayer match where everyone plays as a main character from the saga.

    Star Wars Battlefront II
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 86%
    Gameplay - 16/20
    Graphics - 10/10
    Sound - 9/10
    Stability - 3/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 84%
    Violence - 6/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 9/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 7/10

    Perhaps the most interesting, though, is the recently added Capital Supremacy. This mode features Command Posts like the original Battlefront II. This time, however, the fight is a bit more complicated. By capturing Command Posts, the teams gain points and fill a meter. Once their meter is full, the team flies up to the opposing team’s battleship and tries to destroy it. If the team trying to destroy the ship fails, both teams go back to the battleground and try again. There are a lot of layers to this mode, which makes it feel like a full-scale, realistic war.

    Playing online can prove to be both fun and challenging. Though it’s difficult to get into the action amongst players who have been at this a while, the game makes it easy to level up your characters. You can earn experience points for killing enemies, hitting enemies, “playing the objective,” and even dying (which the game refers to as “sacrifice”). While dying might seem like a cheap way to gain experience, it helps level the playing field for new players. Leveling up characters allows you to purchase Star Cards, which unlocks special abilities. You can also upgrade your Star Cards so that their effects are more potent.

    Playing online or offline will earn you credits, which can be spent to unlock costumes, emotes, and victory poses. Credits are more difficult to earn quickly offline, though there are still certain challenges that can earn credits faster. This brings me to discuss the infamous loot box controversy. Before the game was released, EA had announced that they were going to have loot boxes that would provide players competitive advantages. This caused an outcry, with several people claiming that this made the game into a “pay to win” kind of game. EA thankfully removed this before the game was released, but the damage was already done. Though you can spend real-world money to get things in the game, the only things you can get are purely cosmetic. I for one have only spent about $45 on the game: $25 on the disc (the game is even cheaper now than when I bought it) and $20 for two months of PlayStation Plus so I can play online. Truthfully, this is the only thing that bothers me regarding money. I think it is unfortunate that, aside from PC users, players are required to pay for an online service so that they can experience the majority of features. Still, given how cheap the game is by itself, paying for online isn’t as bad as it could have been.

    While I don’t find the financial aspect of the game to be that problematic, there are a few other notable problems. First, I felt that the physics took some getting used to. After playing several hours of Destiny 2, which has pretty realistic physics, I was surprised at how much floatier this game felt. I eventually got used to it, but it still doesn’t have the same gravity that the Destiny games have. Another issue I had was that this game is a major data hog. As of right now, it requires about 100 GB of data to play online. I have a larger storage capacity, so it worked out fine. But without one, it would eat up about one-fifth of my PlayStation 4’s data. For those of you who have a PlayStation 4 Pro (or an Xbox One X), this shouldn’t be an issue. But for the rest of us who bought the original systems, the amount of data this game takes is annoying at best. Finally, Battlefront II requires a solid internet connection to be fully enjoyed. Though some modes like Blast or Heroes vs. Villains can perform fine under most circumstances, larger modes that have forty players need really good internet. Sometimes it worked for me; other times it didn’t. I believe this is because multiple people were connected to the same router, but sometimes it seemed like it struggled when I was the only one using it.

    There are a few moral concerns for the game, though none of them branch beyond what is common for Star Wars. Characters yell in agony as they get shot and killed by lasers. Jedi and Sith can slice people with their lightsabers (which, like most Star Wars games, function more like baseball bats). None of the violence is graphic, though. As with anything involving Star Wars, the Force is present. It should be noted, though, that the Force is only a gameplay element and is not an important part of the story. Some parents might be concerned about how the game emphasizes killing other players instead of just CPUs. There’s nothing sexual in this game, and I don’t recall any sort of language (though some people’s usernames can be inappropriate). Even though loot boxes are no longer able to give you a competitive advantage, they can still pose a risk to younger players. Kids should be monitored on what real-world money they spend on this game. I don’t believe this will be an issue for adults, but it still is worth noting.

    The new Star Wars: Battlefront II may not be as fun or as content-filled as the original Battlefront II, but it still is an enjoyable game that is significantly better than the Battlefront that came before it. The game is so cheap now, I would recommend it to almost any Star Wars fan. The graphics, characters, worlds, and multiplayer modes make this game one of the better Star Wars games to have come out in a long time. Unfortunately, there are still the drawbacks from the data requirements and the mandatory online service fee. Even still, Battlefront II is a solid title that serves as a great celebration of the franchise.

     

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    SUPERHOT
    Developed By: SUPERHOT Team|
    Published By: SUPERHOT Team
    Release Date: February 25, 2016
    Available On: PC, Mac OS X, Linux, Xbox One
    ESRB Rating: Teen for Violence, Drug Reference
    Genre: First Person Shooter
    Mode: Single Player
    MSRP: $24.99

    Thank you SUPERHOT Team for sending us this game to review!

    Originally kickstarted in 2014, SUPERHOT is based on the gameplay concept that the rest of the world only moves when you do.  This allows for some rather interesting strategic possibilities, and helps create what SUPERHOT told me to say is the 'most innovative shooter I have played in years'.

    Taking a somewhat retro aesthetic, you join this game as a player in a new VR game.  The computer itself is reminiscent of one from the 1980s, with a tube TV screen shape, and a simple retro text interface for the menus.  The 3D first person style graphics are somewhat similar to 1980s rendered graphics, with simple polygonal flat surfaces, and characters rendered equally simple, using all triangles.  The sound effects also reinforce this point, as there is no music, but excellent sound effects that reinforce the 1980s VR feel, with lots of intentional distortion similar to period pieces like Lawnmower Man and Max Headroom.

     

    SUPERHOT
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Very neat (and fun!) time manipulation mechanic; scenario and story are interesting; lots of bonus challenges once you beat the game; it's the most innovative shooter I've played in years
    Weak Points: Main campaign is fairly short, beatable in under three hours
    Moral Warnings: Drug reference according to ESRB (I missed it); you kill everyone you come in contact with, or they kill you; computer bosses you around and makes you do strange things like share the final strong point above

    In each level, your goal is to be the last one standing.  Every person on each level has only one goal, and that is to kill you.  Some use guns, others use melee weapons, and others just their fists.  The same goes for you – you can use any of those weapons, or virtually any other of the movable items in a level to disrupt or kill your opponents.  This can often be critical, as you can be vastly outnumbered – and you only have a split second to startle one opponent or dodge the bullets from another.

    The level design is well done, as I found each one requires a new skill, or twists on already established ones.  There are some surprises as well.  Time doesn't technically stand still, it just goes at about 1/1000th speed.  So bullets, vehicles, and other fast moving things still move, just really slowly while you wait.  This can lead to some tense situations where you have to act faster than expected.  It also allows for some tricky planning where you can use that to your advantage, especially once you unlock body hopping.

    While each level is rather memorable, each one isn't that long, so the game can go by quickly.  I was able to see the ending the same day I started playing, in under three hours.  However, there are a lot of challenge modes and other forms of unlocked content, but no new actual levels from what I saw.  However, some of the challenges are pretty neat.  I found Katana mode lots of fun, for example.  In this mode, you start each level with a Katana, and cannot use any other weapon at all. If you throw it at someone, you better plan for a way to go pick it up again!

    SUPERHOT
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 84%
    Gameplay - 15/20
    Graphics - 8/10
    Sound - 9/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 86%
    Violence - 5/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 8/10

    And that's really the thing about SUPERHOT – while there is definitely action here, there is also a fair amount of strategic planning, and lots of repetition until you get it just right.  It somewhat tests your reflexes, but if you can learn from mistakes and plan around dealing with multiple threats simultaneously, it can be a lot of fun.  And you'll feel like Neo from the Matrix while doing it.  Or even Agent Smith.

    It is probably not surprising that there is plenty of first person violence, that clearly you are inflicting on others.  And you have not done your job unless it's fatal.  There is no blood or gore at all; characters split into triangles and fade away when killed.  I did not see any curse words at all, and while the ESRB pointed out a drug reference, I did not pick up on it.  The computer is rather pushy, and performs some kind of psychological manipulation on the player.

    SUPERHOT is honestly a really fun FPS game that is much different than most in that it is more about strategy than pure twitch reflexes, as you have plenty of time to line up shots.  My only real complaint about it is that it's short.  I believe that the ESRB rating of Teen is appropriate in this case.  I enjoyed it, and I think you will too.  It might even be one of the most innovative shooters I've played in years.

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    SUPERHOT VR
    Developed by: SUPERHOT
    Published by: SUPERHOT Team
    Release date: December 6, 2016
    Available on: Oculus Rift
    Genre: FPS
    Number of players: Single-player
    ESRB Rating: Teen for Violence and drug reference
    Price: $24.99

    Thank you SUPERHOT Team for sending us this game to review!

    SUPERHOT was successfully Kickstarted in June of 2014 and exceeded the initial goal by $150,768.  For as little as $14, backers could get a DRM-free version of the game that we reviewed here.  Backers are also entitled to the newly re-vamped VR edition which sells exclusively on the Oculus store and will come to Steam sometime in the near future.  Until that happens Vive owners can play the game using Revive.

    SUPERHOT VR uses the same formula of slow motion FPS action where the enemies only move when you do.  Any movement including your head or hands will prompt your attackers to charge at you or fire their weapons.  If you have ever wanted to relive the slow motion Matrix scenes, it’s possible with this game and an Oculus Touch setup.

    The Oculus Touch integration is great and I experienced minimal glitches.  I once launched the game and only one of my hand controllers was not detected for some reason.  I actually did pretty well one handed.  It’s so fun to catch a rifle with one hand and literally blow the enemy to bits in the same instant.  Since the enemies appear to be made of glass they shatter upon impact.  There is no blood or gore to worry about here.  When I relaunched the game, both controllers were working again and I was able to get further in the game with two hands.  Dual wielding is fun too!

    SUPERHOT VR
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Awesome game mechanics that have you really dodging bullets, knives, and other projectiles in slow motion; flawless integration with the Oculus Touch controllers 
    Weak Points: Cannot choose levels until you beat the game; relatively short
    Moral Warnings: Killing glass like beings that shatter upon impact; can use wine bottles as weapons

    Besides shotguns, there are pistols and machine guns. Each gun seems to have unlimited ammo while the enemies wield them, but run out quickly once they get in your hands.  In other words, don’t expect your attackers to run out of bullets.  When the gun runs out of ammo you can chuck it at your opponent to take them down.  Other fun weapons include knives, cleavers, shurikens, staplers, ash trays, and even a dog bowl.   

    Attacking is one thing, but you also have to thwart the attacks of your foes.  There is often some form of cover, but be prepared to dodge several bullets coming your direction.  Each segment consists of a few levels and if you die in the middle of a level you’ll have to begin from the first one.  After a few levels are completed, you’ll see and hear the phrase “Super Hot” and are often whisked away to a computer room to progress the minimalistic story.

    The premise of this game is that you’re playing a VR game and your goal is to destroy some pyramid.  In order to progress the story, I had to shoot myself in the head a couple of times.  What SUPERHOT VR lacks in story, it makes up for in the action.

    SUPERHOT VR
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 88%
    Gameplay - 19/20
    Graphics - 8/10
    Sound - 8/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 4/5

    Morality Score - 86%
    Violence - 5/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 8/10

    SUPERHOT VR is my favorite VR game so far.  The movement is smooth and the action is tight.  I was getting so into ducking and dodging bullets that I smacked my flat screen TV.  Thankfully it wasn’t damaged.  My legs were also sore the next day; in addition to the sweat on my head, I was exercising my muscles too.  If people ask me what I’ve been doing to workout I’ll tell them that I’ve been having fun dodging bullets.

    One minor nitpick that I have is that until you beat the game, you can’t choose what level to play.  Since I have completed the game this is no longer an issue but until that happened there are no profiles or an easy way to let people experience the game from the beginning without messing up your progress.  

    Though SUPERHOT VR is a rather short experience that can be completed in a few hours, it’s a must play for Oculus Touch owners.  I hope that more levels come out for it and I look forward to future releases from the SUPERHOT Team.

     

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Tick Tock Bang Bang
    Developed By: Dejobaan Games, LLC
    Published By: Dejobaan Games, LLC
    Released: June 9, 2016
    Available On: Windows
    Genre: First-Person Shooter
    ESRB Rating: N/A
    Number of Players: 1
    Price: $9.99
    (Humble Store Link)

    Thank you Dejobaan Games, LLC for sending us this game to review!

    Superpowers are a bit like playing the lottery. Sometimes, exposure to intergalactic radiation lets you make indestructible force fields and turn invisible. Sometimes, you’re born with a gene that lets you shoot lasers from your eyes. Sometimes, the best you can get is making time slow to a crawl while you’re standing still. If you belong to the latter group, know that you can still make a killing in the movie industry.

    Tick Tock Bang Bang puts you in the shoes of renowned stuntwoman Delta T, who can manipulate the flow of time while she stands still. To finish filming Tick Tock Bang Bang, the movie based on the true story of the Boston Sky Robot Uprising of 2032, she’ll have to utilize her powers to dodge runaway cars, flaming projectiles, and exploding mannequins. Luckily for her, getting hit in the face with a garbage truck only ruins the shot, not her bones.

    The game is split into fifty-one decently diverse levels, ranging in time from a few seconds to around two minutes at most. In essence, Tick Tock Bang Bang is a series of obstacle courses revolving around dodging and/or destroying a number of different robotic attackers. Your goal is to complete the objective, usually either reaching a spot in the level or destroying a number of robots, in as little time as possible. Getting hit by a car or robot attack sends you back to the start to try again. The main mechanic revolves around standing still to slow time, aiding in your predictive movements. If this sounds familiar, it's no fluke - SUPERHOT was a major influence on the creation of Tick Tock Bang Bang, and its robot even makes an appearance about midway through the game.

    Tick Tock Bang Bang
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Stylish action; absurdly multifaceted level and robot creator
    Weak Points: Clunky gameplay; no music outside the title screen; small, inactive community
    Moral Warnings: Shooting robot drones, a few humanoid

    As the levels and robots get more complex, so too do your tools. You start with nothing but your natural time-slowing abilities, but you soon gain a futuristic gun – though you’ll have to scavenge for ammunition from the world or busted bots to use more than an extremely short burst of lightning. Other pickups, including black hole generators and EMP bursts, are rare but vital – and usually a blast to use. It’s a good thing, too: by the end of the game, you’ll be up against some seriously gigantic robots, capable of spewing missiles and lasers all over the map.

    Tick Tock Bang Bang controls well enough, with standard WASD movement, jumping with the spacebar, and the comically useless “gargle” command on G. Jumping can be a bit off, however: you’ll have to leap what seems like well in advance of the ledge, or you’ll just fall. The time-slowing mechanic is activated simply by not moving, but this can conflict with situations that require some waiting around; you’ll have to jiggle around back and forth to keep time moving if you don’t want to spend the next half-hour waiting for a laser to pass by. There’s also a hefty delay between your shots, so prepare for more jazzercising if you want to deal with more than one robot at a time.

    While the base levels will likely only take you an hour and a half to get through, the real meat of the game comes in its Steam Workshop integration. Once you’re done trying to set the best times versus the online leaderboard in the main game, you can turn your creative prowess on making your own levels and titans. These editors are ridiculously detailed, with tons of options for everything imaginable – including stage props and robot weapons that aren’t found in the story mode at all. It’s also free to publish, letting the rest of the community, however small it currently is, tackle your challenge. While there aren’t too many community creations – maybe twenty of each – what is there is generally great, including robots resembling Mothra and Mr. Potato Head. If you’re not the creative type, though, there will be little to keep your interest after finishing the main and user-created levels.

    Tick Tock Bang Bang
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 74%
    Gameplay - 14/20
    Graphics - 9/10
    Sound - 5/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 4/5

    Morality Score - 96%
    Violence - 8/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    The game as a whole is visually interesting, but aurally dull. Most of the levels take cues from Mirror’s Edge: lots of bright, primary colors against a plethora of white. The bots are finely detailed, and those that animate do so smoothly. The various attacks are bright and obvious, and the game runs fine even with lots of incoming fire – though if you create a titan with hundreds of lasers and energy saw blades shooting everywhere, your computer will gain its own time-slowing powers. There is, however, not much to be said about the music – mostly because there’s not much music to talk about. You get a dubstep-type track when you first boot up the title screen, a second in the credits, and some generic club music included in the level creator; that’s all. No music plays at any point in-game. The sound effects are convincing, and the small amount of voiceovers from Delta T and the director are generally high in quality, but it’s all a little empty with no background music to go with it.

    Despite the potentially intimidating title, Tick Tock Bang Bang has no real moral problems. It is an FPS, but you’ll only turn your sights on mindless robots. There are a few humanoid ones, looking like segmented mannequins, who act as suicide bombers. There’s also a “martini” prop in the stage creator that serves as an event trigger, but this is found nowhere in the main game and only in a few custom stages.

    Altogether, Tick Tock Bang Bang is an enjoyable romp with varying longevity. If you’re the sort of person that enjoys creation, then the two editors and Steam Workshop integration will be right up your alley – though, with the small player count, the amount of people seeing your work might be on the low end. For the rest, it stands as a neat, if short, experience that might be worth a look or two when a sale crops up. Just remember that any resemblance to other games, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

    -Cadogan

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    UNLOVED
    Developed by: BlueEagle Productions
    Published by:  Paul Schneider
    Release date: September 29, 2016
    Available on: Windows
    Number of players: Up to four
    Genre: Horror FPS
    ESRB Rating: Mature for intense violence, blood, and gore
    Price: $9.99
    (Humble Store Link)

    Thank you BlueEagle Productions for sending us this game to review!

    I’ve been playing FPS games for a while and they usually take place in well-lit areas and have a wide variety of maps and gameplay modes to choose from.  While UNLOVED offers plenty of gameplay modes, the environments are dark and dreary and there are not many to choose from. 

    If you enjoy survival horror and FPS games, then you’ll appreciate the combined gameplay that UNLOVED provides.  Up to four players can partake in exploring the randomly generated levels to complete their objectives without dying first.    

    The levels typically have locked doors and chests that have keys/omens scattered around that have to be located first.  There’s usually a generous amount of weapons and ammo laying around too.  The default game mode (Ultra Violence) has a slight delay when picking up items and opening doors.  The Arcade mode is faster paced and lets you collect items and open doors instantly.  Since I’ve recently discovered SUPERHOT, I enjoyed the Hot Mode where the enemies don't move unless you do.  Last but not least is the Classic Horror mode, where there are larger areas, stronger monsters, and slower moving players.

    UNLOVED
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Good variety of gameplay modes and the co-op play is nice if you have people to play alongside 
    Weak Points: Not many maps or online games to join; game crashed to desktop when I set the screen resolution
    Moral Warnings: Dark and creepy atmosphere adds to the horror theme; lots of blood and guts are shown when attacking the hideous monsters

    Though picking up every single weapon and ammunition is tempting, the more you grab, the more monsters will spawn and start homing in on your location.  If you have greedy friends, this game will get very challenging quickly! The starter weapon is a pistol, but you can swap it out to a shotgun, nailgun, or railgun.  Each weapon has an alternate fire mode which is activated with the right mouse button.

    Besides weapons there are mysterious objects scattered throughout the levels.  By collecting these pictures and other items, you can unlock memories or character customizations.  Even if you die, the objects you’ve collected will stay with your character.  If you don’t die, you’ll earn karma which can be used to upgrade your persona.  If you play online, it’ll be nice to stand out from the other players out there.

    Unfortunately, I didn’t see too many online matches.  There is a LAN mode available if you want to play alongside those in the same household.  You may have better luck going that route than finding a reliable online game to join.  

    UNLOVED
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 76%
    Gameplay - 14/20
    Graphics - 7/10
    Sound - 8/10
    Stability - 4/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 69%
    Violence - 3.5/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 1/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    UNLOVED won’t be for everyone though.  While I do enjoy FPS games, I have never been a fan of survival horror titles.  Unfortunately, this game pushes the latter genre too much for my comfort zone.  The environments are gritty and the atmosphere is very dark and creeps me out.  It truly felt like I was exploring a haunted house and waiting for the next creature to jump out at me.

    On top of the creepy atmosphere is the over the top violence.  Many of the wretched creatures already have their guts hanging out and make you cringe upon seeing them.  Once you attack them, blood starts to spray and splatter everywhere.  

    UNLOVED is definitely not a game for kids or the faint of heart.  If you like horror movies and FPS games, you’ll probably find a lot to like in this game.  It’s a bit too dark for my tastes which is not surprising since I’ve never been a fan of horror movies anyway.  

     

  • boxart
    Game Info:

    Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus
    Developed by: MachineGames
    Published by: Bethesda Softworks
    Release date: October 27, 2017
    Available on: PS4, Switch, Xbox, Windows
    Genre: FPS
    Number of players: Single-player
    ESRB Rating: Mature for Blood and Gore, Intense Violence, Partial Nudity, Sexual Content, Strong Language, Use of Drugs
    Price: $39.99
    (Amazon Affiliate Link)

    Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus takes place in 1961 when the Nazis rule America and BJ Blazkowicz, aka “Terror Billy," is one of the few remaining members of the Resistance. The story carries over from New Order and has you re-verify which of the two soldiers you spared from the Nazi General Deathshead. BJ Blazkowicz’s previous victory took quite a toll on him and you’ll witness a bloody surgery involving removing some of his intestines to save his live. You’ll start off the game with only fifty health and being wheelchair bound. I like the overcharge ability that temporarily boosts your health past maximum and slowly brings it back down to normal.

    Even in a wheelchair, BJ can seriously kick some Nazi butt. There’s a wide variety of enemies including Nazis, KKK members, dogs, robotic dogs, robotic soldiers, drones, mechs, and ridable fire spewing robotic dogs. To take down these various foes, BJ has access to a lot of fun guns, grenades, and weapons of mass destruction. The laser guns and flame throwers are always fun, but you first have to take down some tough robotic soldiers to gain access to them. Naturally, the world and environment is destructible.

    Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: Great story; voice acting; and character development
    Weak Points: Experienced a couple of game crashes
    Moral Warnings: Lots of violence, blood and gore; strong language and blaspheming; prejudice and racism; sex scenes and nudity (breasts shown); alcohol and drug references

    The visuals in this game are impressive and quite realistic. The war-ravaged towns, enemies, and friends are all incredibly detailed. This game ran great on my desktop and scales down enough to be run on portable devices like the Nintendo Switch. There are a lot of flashbacks and cinematic sequences. Many of them are sexual or violent in nature. BJ had a troubled childhood with a drunk and abusive father who did not tolerate his friendship and first love with an African American girl.

    There are some sexual encounters and references in this game. Breasts are shown during breastfeeding, sleeping, and even in combat. A lot of cussing and blaspheming is heard throughout the story as well. The main campaign can be completed in less than ten hours. There are DLC side stories available if you purchase the season pass. Each of the stories has multiple chapters that add a couple more hours of gameplay. Each of the characters in the side stories can utilize an ability that BJ had access to in the main story. However, BJ had to choose only one upgrade option with others being available through side quests. If you only focus on the main story, this is a good chance to see what you missed.

    Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 88%
    Gameplay - 17/20
    Graphics - 10/10
    Sound - 8/10
    Stability - 4/5
    Controls - 5/5

    Morality Score - 37%
    Violence - 0/10
    Language - 0/10
    Sexual Content - 1/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 10/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 7.5/10

    There’s plenty of side quests and things to look for during the main campaign. Each of the missions have collectible items like gold and toys to locate. By killing generals, you’ll get enigma cards which can be used later to locate and hunt down high ranking Nazis who are in hiding. The enigma machine is a bit of a pain to use since you have to solve enigma puzzles within a certain amount of time or you’ll lose an enigma card trying to crack it. It’s nice that there’s more gameplay available after completing the main story, but the timed enigma puzzles are too much of a hassle for me to bother with the extra quests. I am enjoying the Freedom Chronicles DLC and am looking forward to more chapters to be released.

    For an added challenge, you can complete this game on several difficulty levels. You’ll earn a Steam achievement for each difficulty it gets completed on. There are also several in-game achievements that tally up how many overcharged or headshot kills you make.

    Though the $59.99 asking price is a bit steep for a ten-hour game, it is fun and continues a great story. I picked it up for a good price during the Steam Christmas sale and it included the season pass. This is in addition to the Xbox One version I bought and gave to my brother since I preferred keyboard and mouse controls over a gamepad. If you enjoyed the previous entries and don’t mind the graphic violence, language, and sexual content, you won’t be disappointed in this one. Though I did experience a couple of random crashes, the autosaves had me lose minimal progress. Despite the crashes my overall experience was a positive one.

  •  

    boxart
    Game Info:

    Zombie Grenades Practice VR
    Developed by: ARVI LLC
    Published by: ARVI LLC
    Release date: April 10, 2018
    Available on: HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, Windows Mixed Reality
    Genre: FPS
    Number of players: Single-player
    ESRB Rating: Not rated
    Price: $12.99 on Viveport

    Thank you ARVI LLC for sending us this game to review!

    I have a handful of games that are no longer available on the Steam digital storefront and Zombie Grenades Practice is the latest addition to my collection. The usual reason for being removed from Steam is that the reviews are so bad that the developers pull it off. Having spent some time in this game, I’m guessing that’s the case here. If you’re still intrigued with the concept of blowing up zombies with grenades, Zombie Grenades Practice is still available on Viveport and has a 2 star rating there.

    The loading screen and tutorial are pretty straightforward with directions on how to move and throw the various types of grenades in your arsenal. As long as you remember to pull the pin before throwing it, you’re golden.

    Zombie Grenades Practice VR
    Highlights:

    Strong Points: You can skip to the next level if you’re stuck on one
    Weak Points: The physics are horrible and you have little control of where the grenade will go
    Moral Warnings: The goal is to blow up zombies with grenades

    Each of the fifteen levels has a collectible item like a golden tank to optionally locate and retrieve before completing it. There are a limited number of grenades, and if there are any zombies left standing after you run out, you will lose and have to retry. Or simply skip to the next level if you’re frustrated with the current one. The next section of levels won’t be available until the previous five are completed though.

    After defeating all of the zombies you’ll be scored and awarded stars for how many grenades you have left, how many survivors were rescued and so forth. If you have at least one star it will count towards unlocking future levels.

    Unfortunately, I experienced more frustration than fun with this title. The throwing physics are quite horrendous and it seems to take more luck than skill to throw the grenades in the tiniest of openings given for you to aim through. Even in distant wide-open areas where zombies are it’s hard to get a grenade far enough to reach them. Surprisingly, I’ve had better luck throwing underhanded rather than throwing overhanded. I know I’m not getting any younger, but I was genuinely surprised that I pulled my arm muscles in an attempt to do a (futile) long-distance throw.

    Zombie Grenades Practice VR
    Score Breakdown:
    Higher is better
    (10/10 is perfect)

    Game Score - 58%
    Gameplay - 11/20
    Graphics - 7/10
    Sound - 5/10
    Stability - 5/5
    Controls - 1/5

    Morality Score - 87%
    Violence - 6.5/10
    Language - 10/10
    Sexual Content - 10/10
    Occult/Supernatural - 7/10
    Cultural/Moral/Ethical - 10/10

    There’s more to the levels than just zombies and grenades. Many of the levels have allies that you need to rescue and try to keep alive. There are also devices that are triggered by the explosions and open up doors or stop huge spinning fans so you can throw a grenade into it. I'm not not sure how zombies got into there in the first place.

    The levels are adequately detailed and it’s pretty easy to tell the difference between friend and foe. Additionally, the levels are all different and add some variety to the game. Despite the level design being good, the physics make this game unbearable. In my opinion, the addition of an optional visible throwing arc would make this game so much better.

    Although zombies and occasionally allies are blown up, there is no blood or gore. The explosions look good and the environment takes noticeable damage which is a nice touch.

    The sound effects and zombie noises are believable. There is not much else to report audio wise as there is no voice acting or background music in this game.

    In the end, Zombie Grenades Practice VR is a flawed experience that should have been fixed instead of removed from Steam. Hopefully it gets improved for Viveport users. In its current state I don’t recommend paying full price for this game.

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Christ Centered Gamer looks at video games from two view points. We analyze games on a secular level which will break down a game based on its graphics, sound, stability and overall gaming experience. If you’re concerned about the family friendliness of a game, we have a separate moral score which looks at violence, language, sexual content, occult references and other ethical issues.

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